Spring 2017 Courses

Next semester I will be teaching two courses, both of which focus on digital literacy, rhetoric, and skills:

  • Digital Humanities Internship (INTD 4995) is a course I’ve been teaching every semester since Fall 2013. This course is structured as an internship in which I work with students in the development of digital projects, such as the English Department Website, I ♥︎ E-Poetry, and the Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 3. This course has a capacity of 8 students and it is by invitation only. The course is full for next semester, but if you’re interested in participating, contact me, and I will add you to the waiting list for the Fall 2017 semester.
  • Digital Media Criticism (INGL 3300) is concerned with the production of criticism using a variety of writing genres and formats developed and facilitated in digital media. The students will research, write, and produce criticism of a variety of works available in print and digital media, while learning the genres and conventions of digital genres, such as: blogging, podcasts, videos, listicles, social media performances, electronic literature, and live streaming performances. The course will be taught next semester only on M,W 4:30-5:45 pm. Here’s the flyer.

3300flyer

Fall 2015 Courses

This Fall I will teach three courses, all of which inform digital studies in different ways: Cyberpunk Cinema is a film course that engages the digital thematically while developing a critical vocabulary to analyze cinema. Introduction to Poetry will show how the most intense use of language is shaped by embodied, physical, and digital materials. My Digital Humanities Internship will offer 6 students the chance to collaborate in my projects, developing valuable 21st century digital technology skills.

Read the descriptions below for more details.

Cyberpunk Cinema

blade-runner-2-movieINGL 3345: Topics in Film
Section 036
T, Th 9:00 – 10:20 am
Learn the language of film in a course focused on science fiction post-industrial dystopias, where the lines between human and machine, real and virtual are blurred.

Introduction to Poetry

retrofuturistINGL 3279, Section 030
MWF 9:30 – 10:20 am
Discover the effect of technology and materiality in the creation of poetry: orality, writing, print, audio recording, film, and digital media.

Digital Humanities Internship

Image Source: http://www.digitalmeetsculture.net/tag/digital-humanities/INTD 3995, Sec. 001#
Meet 1.5 hours/week (TBA), work on your own 7.5 hours/week.
This internship will provide hands-on work experience on several Digital Humanities projects I am currently developing, primarily I ♥ E-Poetry, the Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 3, and the English Department Website. The work will involve journalism, translation, describing born-digital materials, developing Web resources using open-source software (such as WordPress), preparing data sets for creative and critical projects, creating brochures, posters, presentations for outreach activities, analyzing works of electronic literature, and related Digital Humanities work.

Enrollment by invitation only. Contact me if you’re interested.

Spring 2015 Courses

This Spring 2015 Semester I will be teaching three courses, described as follows:

English 6055: Multimodal Literature in the Digital Age

6055banner

This course is concerned with multimodal literary expression in an age of digital media—a set of technologies which allow for the integrated representation of visual, textual, and aural information. The course will explore ways in which digital media can represent traditional literary texts beyond the capabilities of print by providing access to archival and manuscript materials in multimodal representations while offering new tools for their study. It will also investigate how digital media remediates and reinvents comics, placing them in conversation with born-digital genres, such as webcomics, HTML5 comics, memes, animated GIFs, and video games. The course will also survey genres of electronic literature—language-based engagements of digital media’s multimodal and programmable capabilities.

Mondays, from 6:30 – 9:00 pm.

Advanced undergraduate students welcomed!

English 3325: Modern Poetry

3325wordle

This course will explore Modernism as a poetic movement with antecedents in the 19th Century, a chief lines of development during the early to mid 20th Century, a counter-movement in the second half of the 20th Century, and a poetics that continues into the 21st century, with Digital Modernism. Special attention will be given to the major works and literary schools collectively understood to be part of the Modern poetic literary movements in English and American literature.

Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays, from 9:30 -10:20 am.

Some spots reserved for English majors. Go to English Department.

INTD 4995: Digital Humanities Internship

Wordle from Flores y Compañía site.

This internship will provide hands-on work experience on several Digital Humanities projects I am currently developing, primarily I ♥ E-Poetry, the CELL project, the Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 3, the English Department, and the Fulbright @ UPRM websites. The work will involve developing and tagging files with metadata, working on link structures, describing born-digital materials, learning how to use open-source software like WordPress to build collections, knowledge bases, and resources, preparing data sets for visualizations, developing Web resources, brochures, posters, and other related Digital Humanities work.

Meet 1.5 hours/week (TBA), work on your own 7.5 hours/week.

Enrollment by invitation only. Contact me if you’re interested.

Recruiting for Fall 2014 Digital Humanities Internship

I am seeking to recruit up to 15 interns to help me develop some digital humanities and Web development projects I am currently developing. These unpaid internships count as 3 credits of an elective course (a recommended elective for English majors): INTD 4995, section 001#. The projects are:

Part of the work will involve developing and tagging files with metadata, working on link structures, describing born-digital materials, learning how to use open-source software like WordPress, Drupal, and Omeka to build collections, knowledge bases, and resources, preparing data sets for visualizations using Gephi, and other related Digital Humanities activities. Another part will focus on developing resources for several websites, including I ♥ E-Poetry, the English Department website, Fulbright @ UPRM, and others.

After completing the course, students should be able to:

  1. use software like WordPress, Drupal, Omeka, and Gephi
  2. encode files according to standardized metadata schema
  3. analyze the structure of collections and knowledge bases
  4. become conversant in the discourse of Digital Humanities
  5. develop resources to contribute to the research projects

Students will need to dedicate 8 hours per week to the project, but you’ll be able to do the work wherever you like, as long as you have a computer and Internet access. We will have weekly 60 minute-long team meetings to report on progress and assign tasks.

You can take this course twice for up to 6 credits during your studies at UPRM. For more information, such as the activities being done this semester, visit my internship website.

If you’re interested, contact me (leonardo.flores@upr.edu) and enroll in INTD 4995, section 001#.

Digital Studies Courses

digital studies

I am pleased to announce the launching of a series of courses I will be teaching around a framework I’m developing on campus called digital studies. My short term goal is to develop and adapt existing courses that help develop students’ proficiency and critical thinking about the impact of digital media and technologies. My long-term goal is to develop an interdisciplinary minor that incorporates disciplines such as computer and social sciences, the arts and humanities, engineering, and business administration  to better prepare students for a world that increasingly requires academics and professionals with sophisticated digital media skills.

In order to train a cohort of digital media savvy students, I have offered the following courses this academic year:

Here’s a list of my offerings over the summer and next academic year:

  • Summer 2014:
    • Digital Writing for the Media (ENGL 3268) (see flyer)
    • This course will explore the Web as a platform for organizations to publish information, news, press releases, and other kinds of professional writing. The course will use several UPRM based organizations as case studies, and the students will develop content, Web resources, and shape their online presence as part of their class projects.
  • Fall 2014:
  • Spring 2015:

As writing courses, their goals can be easily achieved with a focus on the impact of digital media on these kinds of writing and expanding their focus to explore emergent genres.

Students interested in following me in this curricular trail should contact me, enroll in the courses, and I’ll show you how deep the rabbit hole goes…

Difficulties Registering for INGL 3300 or 3345?

The course INGL 3300: Worlds of Fantasy and one of the sections of INGL 3345: Fantasy Film have been reserved for English Department students to have first access to them. If you are not in the English Department and would like to take either of these courses, you must wait until the “periodo de ajustes y cambios a la matricula” begins in late July. At that point, all the spaces not occupied by English Department students will become available– and there should be plenty for those interested, but you’ll need to move fast.

Fantasy Film Course

In the Fall of 2008 (and in the Spring of 2009) I will be teaching INGL 3345, a Topics in Film course that will focus on the fantasy genre. This is a course that takes a formalist and historical approach to this genre in film, which has its roots in the very beginnings of cinema with George Melies’ A Trip to the Moon in 1902. The course is at its core a formalist exploration of film as a medium for expression and is designed to provide you with the critical vocabulary and attention to technical detail that will enable you to look at movies with new eyes and get more from the experience. It will also survey major works of fantasy in film throughout the 20th century, paying special attention to directors and writers whose work had a strong impact in the genre.

Continue reading “Fantasy Film Course”